Resources

Bringing a new pet into your home is an exciting event. There is so much to do, so much to learn. It’s a time for you to get to know your new friend…and for him or her to get to know you.

Remember that your home is a new and unfamiliar setting for the animal. Give him or her a chance to acclimate to these new surroundings. Often, a dog or a cat may be shy, wary, or even hide once they come into a new home. This is normal. Patience and understanding will go a long way toward creating a comfortable experience for you new pet.

  • Provide a quiet space for your animal away from the bustle of the household, particularly in the first weeks.
  • Schedule a visit to the veterinarian for a complete physical and to make sure your new pet is fully inoculated.
  • Talk to the veterinarian about appropriate food for your pet. Puppies/kittens, adult dogs/cats, and senior animals all have different nutritional needs.
  • Make sure fresh, clean water is always available for your new pet.
  • Proper identification is important, and should be with your pet at all times. Your pet should always wear a collar and tag. Microchip identification is also a good idea (a small, permanent microchip is inserted under the animal’s skin by your veterinarian, and can be read by animal shelters or veterinarian offices in the event your pet is lost).
  • Remember that your new pet will require a lot of love, care, and understanding for a long, healthy, happy life.

Adoption

Once you decide to bring a new animal into your home, the next big decision is where to find your new friend. Adoption is a rewarding and conscientious choice. There are so many wonderful animals who are in need of a good home like the one you could provide. A shelter or rescue organization such as Found are great places to start your search. Often, animals adopted from shelter or rescue organizations are already spayed or neutered (or they can make arrangements to have these important surgeries done), inoculated, and microchipped. And by adopting, you will have the satisfaction of knowing you provided a good home to a homeless animal.

Dog Health Check List

Making sure your dog lives a long, healthy, happy life is your responsibility. To do this, you will have to provide:

  • Proper veterinary care, including yearly check ups, vaccinations, and attention whenever your dog is sick or injured
  • Good, wholesome food targeted to the age of your dog (remember, puppies, adult dogs, and senior dogs all have different nutritional requirements)
  • Clean, fresh water
  • Proper exercise, including daily walks
  • Training classes such as those offered by Found or Stay to help you both understand how to relate to each other
  • Proper socialization
  • Appropriate toys (both for chewing and for play)
  • Regular grooming, including brushing, bathing, and nail trimming
  • Lots of love, care, and understanding

Cat Health Check List

Making sure your cat lives a long, healthy, happy life is your responsibility. To do this, you will have to provide:

  • Proper veterinary care, including yearly check ups, vaccinations, and attention whenever your cat is sick or injured
  • Good, wholesome food targeted to the age of your cat (remember, kittens, adult cats, and senior cats all have different nutritional requirements)
  • Clean, fresh water
  • Clean, accessible litter box
  • Proper socialization
  • Regular grooming, including brushing and nail trimming
  • A scratching post
  • Appropriate toys
  • Lots of love, care, and understanding

Emergencies

The best way to help an animal in an emergency is to be prepared before an emergency occurs. Always have your veterinarian’s information in an easily accessible location. Find the local emergency veterinary clinics in your area and familiarize yourself with their locations and contact information. If your pet takes any kind of medication, have a list readily available to give to a veterinarian in the event of an emergency. You can also talk with your veterinarian about learning basic first aid techniques for your pet.